highlights international perspective

Charles W. Bartlett, (English, 1860-1940)

2nd Series. Japan: Kyoto

Color woodblock print. The artist's CWB monogram in the composition at lower left, with the title and date cartouche, KYOTO. 1916. Published by Watanabe Shôzaburô.

25.4 by 37.9 cm

Alternate title: The Bridge

Bartlett and his wife traveled to the continent frequently, and in 1913, they commenced a three-year trip around the world, reaching Japan in late 1915. Not long after his arrival, Bartlett visited the studio of the print publisher, Watanabe Shôzaburô, who probably would have been working on Fritz Capelari (cat. nos. 11-12) prints at the time. Bartlett showed a selection of watercolor sketches from his travels which Watanabe proposed developing into woodblock prints, but first he had Bartlett convert the pencil-based designs to Japanese brush and ink paintings in order to facilitate the block carving process.

During this first trip to Japan in 1915, the Bartletts met Elizabeth Keith (cat. no. 17), and became fast friends. Keith, an amateur artist with no known academic training, would eventually become another foreign artist to produce prints with Watanabe, but not until 1919.

References:
Meech, Japonisme: Graphic Arts in the 20th Century, in The New Wave, 1993, pp. 46-47; and p. 211, pl. 291
Merritt, Points of Contrast, 1993, pp. 36-39
Yokohama Museum of Art, Eyes Towards Asia: Ukiyo-e Artists from Abroad, 1996, p. 82, no. 95-a
Miles & Saville, A Printmaker in Paradise: The Art and Life of Charles W. Bartlett, 2001, p. 118, no. 31

kikumon

Scholten Japanese Art is open Monday - Friday, and some Saturdays by appointment only

Contact Katherine Martin at
(212) 585-0474 or email
kem@scholten-japanese-art.com
to schedule a visit between 11am and 4pm for no more than two individuals at a time.
In order to adhere to New York State guidelines visitors are asked to wear face masks and practice social distancing.

site last updated
September 22, 2020

Scholten Japanese Art
145 West 58th Street, suite 6D
New York, New York 10019
ph: (212) 585-0474
fx: (212) 585-0475